Music Hall of Williamsburg
The Filmshop Presents: Kill Your Darlings

The Filmshop Presents: Kill Your Darlings

Wild Yaks, Cultfever, H.P. Public Library

Sat, July 13, 2013

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Music Hall of Williamsburg

Brooklyn, NY

$12

This event is 18 and over

The Filmshop Presents: Kill Your Darlings
The Filmshop Presents: Kill Your Darlings
We are back! This time Filmshop bounces off the scene with its 8th Bi-annual celebration of the thing we all love the best, that’s right, film! The theme to this summers extravaganza: Kill Your Darlings! Read into it what you’d like, but let our members do the rest by taking you on a journey through their interpretations of the classic expression. Join us at Music Hall of Williamsburg at 66 N 6th st. in Williamsburg on Saturday, July 13th at 8 Pm for a night of creation and exploration through film and music. Short film selections from our Brooklyn and Manhattan chapters start at 9:15 PM right after an 8:30 set from the delectable sounds of H.P. Public Library. But don’t plan the rest of your night just yet, because this eve packs quite the punch with performances by Cultfever and Wild Yaks plus DJ sets by Sultans of Swat and L’Empire De Sen to to follow and help you dance all night long. So if you have missed us before or just miss us, here is your chance to show some love!

ABOUT FILMSHOP:



Founded in 2009, the Filmshop is a collective of emerging independednt filmmakers and media producers committed to developing their work through a collaborative process. Chapter in Brooklyn and Manhattan meet weekly to workshop projects, incubate new ideas and support their peers. “Kill Your Darlings” is a joint project of the Manhattan and Brooklyn groups.

This event is sponsored, in part, by the Greater New York Arts Development Fund of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, administered by Brooklyn Arts Council (BAC).
Wild Yaks
Wild Yaks
This is some writing that this girl Maud did about about us on her blog. I don't know this girl, if I did she would ... (more) know how actually messy my apartment is or how truly, beautifully refined my taste in movies is. I'm also using this, as I'm wont to do, without her permission, but mostly because her blog doesn't offer any way of getting in touch with her. Without further ado: Sweaty boys playing sloppy drunk jammy music is the reason why I like dudes, and Wild Yaks do it oh so well. I want to be their friends because I bet they have a really dirty apartment and watch really good movies. I want to listen to their music because it's masculine and not at all pretentious and they're so into it and their glasses slide off their noses and their shorts are too short.

The drummer looks like a beardier Williamsburgier Iggy Pop. They sing songs about girls and love and tomahawks and pearls like the world and beg for a new guitar when they bust their own. They have a saxophone player with really sticky-uppy hair. You could totally kick ass and run around and drive your car to their songs. Their myspace url is "boyhoodforever" which makes me think they may be aware of how dudely they are but it makes me like them more. They also played this slower song that actually DID remind me of Jonathan Richman, specifically the part in "A Plea For Tenderness" that goes "I know how beautiful death is (duh duh duh duh duh)/ I know why you hate life..." and so on. They're kind of like a screamier Modern Lovers. Or maybe they're just what The Modern Lovers would be like if they weren't straight edge. If they were real real real drunk.
Cultfever
Cultfever
The Brooklyn duo Cultfever creates cinematic music in Technicolor. Its sound comes through in 35mm and Dolby-surround, sweeping wide shots, urgent dissolves and auteuristic composition, reminiscent of the brooding, surreal worlds of Almodovar, The Man Who Fell To Earth, and Tim Burton. You don't just hear Cultfever; its music plays out before you like a moving picture, helmed by its dual directors, Tamara Jafar and Joe Durniak. The experience is hyper-sensory, with Jafar and Durniak communicating ideas and motifs to one another using an image-based vocabulary, sharing references and visual cues that build towards grand, anthemic emotions. The result is an abstract visual landscape, a road map of how their songs are designed to make you feel. The pair formed the band quickly after meeting in 2010, sensing an immediate chemistry, and released a self-titled full-length in 2011 as well as the Animals EP in 2013. Playing SXSW, CMJ, Northside, and other leading industry festivals, Cultfever earned praise for both its fiery live show (which includes Ignacio Rivas Bixio on drums and Jafar and Durniak on a combination of vocals, synths, and guitar) and the recordings, with singles "Knewyouwell" and "Collector" propelling the band into the CMJ Radio Top 200. Writing and recording together in their personal studio, Jafar and Durniak share an obvious bond, describing their relationship as "chosen family." Their creative process is malleable, a shared vision that ebbs and flows organically, weaving in each member's ideas to create a cohesive aesthetic. Cultfever extends that reciprocal energy and focus to its live show, Jafar and Durniak's unique connection undeniable and infectious. Now, putting the finishing touches on the second album, the band is releasing the new single, "Gloria," a riveting, beat-driven pop anthem that bursts with dark overtones and moments of blissful synthetic light. Listen, and you can see and feel just as much as you hear; colors swirl, nights fall, suns rise, the spotlight reveals, shadows pervade. The conceptual and sonic density of Cultfever's music rewards repeated listening, like discovering something new in a film you've seen dozens of times. You listen in stereo but you perceive in 3D, synapses firing, roulette wheel spinning, urging you into its world.
Venue Information:
Music Hall of Williamsburg
66 North 6th St
Brooklyn, NY, 11249
http://www.musichallofwilliamsburg.com/
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