Music Hall of Williamsburg
Iceage, A Place to Bury Strangers

Part of Northside Festival

Iceage

A Place to Bury Strangers

Lower, Bennio Qwerty, Bambara

Thu, June 13, 2013

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Music Hall of Williamsburg

Brooklyn, NY

$15

This event is 18 and over

Iceage
Iceage
If you’re reading this, you’re probably part of whatever is left of the music press in 2011. There is no reason to explain the state of modern, relevant punk rock to you; you’re paid (in one way or another) to know it all. Fittingly, there is no reason to outline any scene reports or regional histories that brought about the formation of Copenhagen’s Iceage. Its members are teenagers, presently 18 or 19 years of age, and as with most people that age, it doesn’t do any good to cite influences. Rather, Iceage mixes punk, post-punk, Goth and hardcore as if they invented it, and does such an excellent job of blending these tropes with the pent-up energy and frustration of the just-post-pubescent years of young mens’ lives, that they might as well have.
New Brigade is Iceage’s debut album (licensed from Escho Records of Denmark); 26 minutes of anthemic stress, of tension undiluted by worldly wisdom or amassed experience. Following a seven-inch single (recorded by Peter Peter, of the Sods and Sort Sol) and compilation track, New Brigade displays a confidence that substitutes worldly experience for the thrills of discovery, of knowing that it is possible to forge your own path in light of adults, the establishment, and prevailing wisdom telling you to do otherwise. In this tradition, New Brigade’s twelve songs rush past, long enough to hit you in the chest and short enough to make you wonder what happened. YouTube shows Iceage’s live shows to be frenetic, sometimes violent affairs with very little compromise in the way of sound or concept. You may get pushed around. Deal with it. This is a punk record from a punk band that plays punk shows. American audiences will get their first chance to see them play this summer, once they finish their current year of high school.
There likely will not be a record of this type so singular and stunning until Iceage makes another one.
A Place to Bury Strangers
A Place to Bury Strangers
"That's the most intense fear and feeling--when you go to a show and you're actually scared," says Oliver Ackermann, guitarist and frontman of Brooklyn trio A Place To Bury Strangers.

"Or you can palpably feel the danger in the music," adds bassit Dion Lunadon, "Like it's going to fall apart at any moment and the players doing it are so in the moment they don't give a shit about anything else. They're just going for it. It's a gutter kinda vibe; everything about it is icky and evil and dangerous."

The band are currently working on their 5th album with an eye toward a fall release. Rather than fixate on the minute recording details like they may have done in the past, the group, rounded out by drummer Lia Simone are trusting their instincts and trying to keep things as pure as possible. Music is much more exhilarating when it's unpredictable even on repeat plays. Simone makes her recording debut with the band here, and it's obvious that she’s helped pushed the band's recordings closer to the level of their infamous live shows.
Bennio Qwerty
Bennio Qwerty
Bennio Qwerty began on a Brooklyn construction site in the Summer of 2012. Working together on a four month build-out of a bar in South Williamsburg, guitarist/singer Mike Barron and bassist Nathan Delffs quickly bonded over their love of Lungfish, Scott Walker, and Drive Like Jehu. Naturally, they decided to start a project of their own.



Mike, a member of the Brooklyn indie-pop quintet North Highlands, and Nathan, formerly of Brooklyn-by-way-of-Portland's Forest Fire, enlisted Louie Glaser, a long time friend, middle school music teacher, and member of Wise Blood to drum. The band gelled instantly. A month later Bennio Qwerty had a set’s worth of material and began playing shows in and around their Brooklyn neighborhood. They released the aptly titled “EP” in February of 2013 and returned to the studio to track four more songs for a second, slightly more creatively titled, “Picture Of” EP to be released this summer.



Bennio Qwerty’s earlier material is turbulent and flush with the exuberance of a band still thrilled to have discovered one another. Compared to those recordings, their new EP’s title track, “Picture Of” has a smoother, more controlled feel. While it still hints at the influences that brought them together, the song is a natural progression for a band becoming more comfortable with its sound. Like the neighborhoods they help to build, the song is urban in tone—hypnotic and mechanical—but Barron is skeptical. He shrugs, “Thoughts on moving west? Thoughts on leaving all this? We could pack up and do it this spring, we could leave this city behind.”
Bambara
Bambara
In marrying the maniacal ravings of The Birthday Party and the noisy, ugliness of early Swans with the tangled cowpunk of The Gun Club and recent Iceage, vocalist/guitarist Reid Bateh, drummer Blaze Bateh, and bassist William Brookshire create something wholly idiosyncratic, and ultimately more satisfying than most anything else in the current post-punk landscape.

The Brooklyn-based trio has been honing its noise-punk brutalism since forming in Athens, Ga., in 2009. After a year of recording in their basement apartment, BAMBARA released their haunting LP Dreamviolence in 2013 to much critical acclaim and tours with A Place to Bury Strangers and METZ.
Venue Information:
Music Hall of Williamsburg
66 North 6th St
Brooklyn, NY, 11249
http://www.musichallofwilliamsburg.com/