Music Hall of Williamsburg
Foxing, Sorority Noise, Moving Mountains, Shortly

BrooklynVegan Presents - Triple Crown Records 20th Anniversary:

Foxing

Sorority Noise

Moving Mountains

Shortly

Fri, December 8, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Music Hall of Williamsburg

Brooklyn, NY

$17 advance / $20 day of show

This event is 18 and over

Foxing
Foxing
If you've ever looked at an old document and noticed brown spots on it, what you are seeing are signs of aging. It's not exactly clear what specifically causes them, but one day, the page will completely brown over and be no more. This is called foxing.

A group of St. Louis musicians took this idea and turned it into a band. "From the conception of the band, we realized: we're not gonna be around forever," says Foxing singer Conor Murphy. "There's classic literature that over time grows really old. But hopefully, you can make something that meant something at some point and will mean something down the road, even if it is aged and dated. That's always what keeps me going, the idea that we're writing something now that we won't be able to write in ten years." At only 21, Murphy is wise beyond his years and Foxing's debut album, The Albatross is indisputable proof of that.

The Albatross has an epically beautiful, almost cinematic quality to it, a fact which the band members, some of whom were film students, are acutely aware of. Listening to their song "Rory" along with the music video they made for it is not only an emotionally jarring experiences but highlights the fact that Foxing have a bigger picture in mind than simply making music. It's not just a sound, it's a deeper, fuller concept fueled by a palpable sense of raw honesty and soul- bearing. It's not just a band, it's the most vulnerable parts of their lives, reflected back at them.

Coll and Murphy write the lyrics together and cull from their lives and current real-life experiences. They are open and genuine about themselves in their lyrics, almost to a fault, sometimes putting a strain on their relationships with those around them. "The people that those songs are about, there's no way they wouldn't know it was about them," says Coll. "Sometimes, there's the desire to not put your life so far out there. But it's also important to not hold back." The two have a unique process of co-editing each other's songs. "When we were writing the record, one of the biggest things I'd talk to Conor about was: I don't care if people like this record or not. I mean, I want people to enjoy it, but the one thing that would gut me would be if people said the lyrics are disingenuous."

Foxing's forthright lyrical honesty paired with their stunning orchestral sound quickly started earning them devoted fans, some of whom have been so emotionally moved that they've openly wept at the band's live shows. It's something Foxing didn't expect and certainly were not prepared for. "I was really surprised at the reception we got from this record because it's very, very specific and personal so it's weird to have people grasp that and feel a kindredness to it, that's insane to me," says Coll. In addition to the new fans who were responding to Foxing's music in such a personal way, the band also caught the attention of Triple Crown Records. The label took notice of the organic buzz surrounding the band and are re-mastering and re-releasing The Albatross.

Although The Albatross has a distinctly timeless quality it about it, Foxing recognize that while they're proud of the album, it won't hold up forever. Much like their namesake, the pages their words are written on will eventually brown over and fade away. "The thing that binds everybody together is the idea that death is completely imminent. age is an ever-looming idea that we can all agree on," notes Murphy. "We make this music, we release it, and then, one day, it dies."
Sorority Noise
Sorority Noise
the champagne of bands
Moving Mountains
Moving Mountains
There are moments when the members of Westchester, New York's Moving Mountains wonder if they should've been born a decade earlier. Their Triple Crown Records debut, Waves, harkens back to the early 2000s and finds inspiration from bands like Sunny Day Real Estate, Engine Down, Cave In, and Further Seems Forever.

"A part of us wishes we were a band that were emerging in 2001...but in a weird way, it motivates us to pick up where some of those bands left off," says frontman Gregory Dunn.

Moving Mountains have sought to create something special, and Waves does an incredible job of proving that. The songs are teeming with resplendent, ethereal, guitar-driven atmospherics that slowly fade into your consciousness.

Gregory Dunn co-founded the band as a studio project in 2005 with drummer Nick Pizzolato. Dunn and Pizzolato wrote and recorded a self-titled demo EP that was leaked to the public in early 2006 and was followed by 2007's Pneuma, which Deep Elm Records re-issued the following year.

"After we put out Pneuma, we formed a band to perform those songs live, and that's when we got guitarist Frank Graniero and bassist Mitchell Lee," explains Dunn.

That newly formed band's first collective effort would be Foreword, a dense, 36-minute four-song EP that they released in late 2008 on their own label, Caetera Recordings. By this time, bands like Thursday, Say Anything, The Dear Hunter and Polar Bear Club had begun championing the band and inviting them on the road.

"The Say Anything tour was our first big, full U.S. tour, where we were playing in front of 1,000 people a day. We built up a ton of momentum and it just worked out. We've been so fortunate because it hasn't been about trying to sell our band on people -- it's been about trying to get in contact with them directly and then just crossing our fingers," Dunn says.

The experience of watching crowds react to their basement creations heavily inspired them when they set out to begin work on Waves in late 2009.

"Our goal with Waves was to have someone be engaged from the start to the end," declares Gregory Dunn.

Engaged they will be. With Waves, Moving Mountains has produced a powerful collection of majestic, post-hardcore songs that contain a textured urgency that reaches farther and harder than any of their previous work. Lyrically, the album speaks of loss and faith, intertwining topics that Dunn has long dealt with.

"When the band first started, a very close friend of mine passed away. That was one of the big motivations for all the lyrics on Pneuma. They're very figurative and overly metaphorical, because I was embarrassed to talk about it at that time. With Waves, I said to myself that it's the last time that I'm going to write about it, so I'm going to be really blunt, honest and straightforward about the subject. Pneuma, Foreword and now Waves have all been about that... a lot of it is also my struggle with understanding faith and existence... and just about questioning those ideas--and most importantly--how to overcome that to appreciate what you have."
Venue Information:
Music Hall of Williamsburg
66 North 6th St
Brooklyn, NY, 11249
http://www.musichallofwilliamsburg.com/