Music Hall of Williamsburg
Iceage, A Place to Bury Strangers

Part of Northside Festival

Iceage

A Place to Bury Strangers

Lower, Bennio Qwerty, Bambara

Thu, June 13, 2013

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Music Hall of Williamsburg

Brooklyn, NY

This event is 18 and over

Iceage
Iceage
If you’re reading this, you’re probably part of whatever is left of the music press in 2011. There is no reason to explain the state of modern, relevant punk rock to you; you’re paid (in one way or another) to know it all. Fittingly, there is no reason to outline any scene reports or regional histories that brought about the formation of Copenhagen’s Iceage. Its members are teenagers, presently 18 or 19 years of age, and as with most people that age, it doesn’t do any good to cite influences. Rather, Iceage mixes punk, post-punk, Goth and hardcore as if they invented it, and does such an excellent job of blending these tropes with the pent-up energy and frustration of the just-post-pubescent years of young mens’ lives, that they might as well have.
New Brigade is Iceage’s debut album (licensed from Escho Records of Denmark); 26 minutes of anthemic stress, of tension undiluted by worldly wisdom or amassed experience. Following a seven-inch single (recorded by Peter Peter, of the Sods and Sort Sol) and compilation track, New Brigade displays a confidence that substitutes worldly experience for the thrills of discovery, of knowing that it is possible to forge your own path in light of adults, the establishment, and prevailing wisdom telling you to do otherwise. In this tradition, New Brigade’s twelve songs rush past, long enough to hit you in the chest and short enough to make you wonder what happened. YouTube shows Iceage’s live shows to be frenetic, sometimes violent affairs with very little compromise in the way of sound or concept. You may get pushed around. Deal with it. This is a punk record from a punk band that plays punk shows. American audiences will get their first chance to see them play this summer, once they finish their current year of high school.
There likely will not be a record of this type so singular and stunning until Iceage makes another one.
A Place to Bury Strangers
A Place to Bury Strangers
Noise is like death; they are both prone to speculations about what might or might not might be there, falsely perceived or deceptively real. They require a free fall of faith. In noise, you may choose to land lovingly on melody or you may stay lost in the technicolor grey sheets of teeth-on-glass distortion. If purgatory were an airport, Oliver would be the voice echoing through the abandoned terminals leading you to your departure, the sky above the runway filled with jets like a swarm of metallic locust. And that bass has got you feeling like riding a torpedo into Atlantis. It's enough to make the kids in back overtake security and rip up the front row seats and throw them into a bonfire because nobody can sit down to this shit anyway. This isn't the music to pick up the pieces, it's about calling bad luck bullshit and shattering that mirror into more pieces than there are empty coke bags in Brooklyn. It's safer than chemicals but it gives you the same high. It's a one sided argument; a thousand turbines aimed at a million megaphones in the bottom of the Grand Canyon aimed at your neighbor's window. Running lawnmowers dropped into a pool full of aluminum cans. A hail of light bulbs on a tin roof. This is infinite night, a dragstrip of mirrors, speed without end, amen.

A Place to Bury Strangers have recently finished recording their fourth album, Transfixiation. It will be released on Dead Oceans on February 17, 2015 and they will be previewing material from it at this show.
Bennio Qwerty
Bennio Qwerty
Bennio Qwerty began on a Brooklyn construction site in the Summer of 2012. Working together on a four month build-out of a bar in South Williamsburg, guitarist/singer Mike Barron and bassist Nathan Delffs quickly bonded over their love of Lungfish, Scott Walker, and Drive Like Jehu. Naturally, they decided to start a project of their own.



Mike, a member of the Brooklyn indie-pop quintet North Highlands, and Nathan, formerly of Brooklyn-by-way-of-Portland's Forest Fire, enlisted Louie Glaser, a long time friend, middle school music teacher, and member of Wise Blood to drum. The band gelled instantly. A month later Bennio Qwerty had a set’s worth of material and began playing shows in and around their Brooklyn neighborhood. They released the aptly titled “EP” in February of 2013 and returned to the studio to track four more songs for a second, slightly more creatively titled, “Picture Of” EP to be released this summer.



Bennio Qwerty’s earlier material is turbulent and flush with the exuberance of a band still thrilled to have discovered one another. Compared to those recordings, their new EP’s title track, “Picture Of” has a smoother, more controlled feel. While it still hints at the influences that brought them together, the song is a natural progression for a band becoming more comfortable with its sound. Like the neighborhoods they help to build, the song is urban in tone—hypnotic and mechanical—but Barron is skeptical. He shrugs, “Thoughts on moving west? Thoughts on leaving all this? We could pack up and do it this spring, we could leave this city behind.”
Bambara
Bambara
"Seeing a Bambara set live is sorta like getting trapped in a long, dark corridor with the vague sensation that you are being followed by the thing that terrifies you most … so long as what you’re scared of is experimental indie bands with a tendency to be mellow very loudly." - Weekly Dig Boston
Venue Information:
Music Hall of Williamsburg
66 North 6th St
Brooklyn, NY, 11211
http://www.musichallofwilliamsburg.com/