Music Hall of Williamsburg
King Tuff

Converse Rubber Tracks Live

King Tuff

Metz, Sean Bones, Devin

Wed, December 19, 2012

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Music Hall of Williamsburg

Brooklyn, NY

Sold Out

This event is 18 and over

Free Show. Tickets available through Ticketmaster. Subject to capacity.

King Tuff
King Tuff
King Tuff’s new record is called Black Moon Spell.
It was produced and recorded by Bobby Harlow at Studio B in Los Angeles, California, in the hot winter of 2014.
No one involved was prepared to make a record, but an invisible hand pushed them to do it. Perhaps it was God or that special someone we all know and love called The Devil.
God and The Devil actually have very similar interests. They both love electric guitars and they both want you to listen to Black Moon Spell and freak the fuck out.
There were many strange occurrences during the recording session- Dracula landlords, flashes of mysterious light, haunted microphones, songs that mixed themselves, demonic vortexes swirling in coffee cups, etc.
Under the Black Moon Spell you may experience euphoria, demented visions, wet dreams, bouts of backwards laughter, and dazed confusion resulting in primordial dancing.
Fire played a very important role in the making of this album. King Tuff loves fire.
For some reason, no one can really explain how the Black Moon Spell came to be. It just appeared one day and demanded heavy rock music and meatball subs.
Backwards messages may be found on this record.
Los Angeles, full of its screaming coyotes and creeping helicopters, surely slathered its sexy, twisted, hairy, polluted spirit all over Black Moon Spell. The Sunset Strip shat itself when it heard all these guitar solos.
A lot of people always ask King Tuff when he’s gonna put out a new record. The answer is September 23, 2014.
Can you feel the Black Moon Spell creeping up the back of yr neck yet?
King Tuff would prefer not to tell you the full story of making this record because its long and crazy and you wouldn’t believe him anyway. Also, I am King Tuff.
Magic Jake, who played bass and is beautiful like sunshine, would like to take this moment to give you a hug and invite you to a tanning party on a beach of your choice.
Old Gary, who plays drums and has the most glorious cackle, would like to take this moment to crack a cold one with you and invite you to watch the old ballgame with him.
Old Gary was out watching the old ballgame, so a wild critter named Ty Segall played drums on the song “Black Moon Spell”. Ty enjoys speaking in a goblin voice in his spare time.
Night fell on Studio B. A Tarot card leapt from the deck and said, “No human judgement is of any value here.” King Tuff agreed.
Sub Pop first discovered King Tuff curled up in his palace in Vermont. It was basically a shit hut made of moss, mud, and glimmering stones hidden near the graveyard, and it was guarded by beautiful wild bullfrogs with silver fangs and baseball bats.
Punx, Squares, Skaters, Farmers, Bartenders, Grandparents, Stoners, Carpenters, Hobos, Heshers, Babes, Babies, Plumbers, Strippers, Art Teachers, Teenagers, Townies, Moms, Dads, Truck Drivers, and Witches will all love this record.
Every song on Black Moon Spell was written without giving a shining fuck about nothing.
Listen to Black Moon Spell, turn yr volume knob up to 666, put yr lover in a 69, and let yr inner grinagog rear it’s wicked, unwashed, smiling snake head.
Listen to Black Moon Spell and give yr ears what they’ve been begging for all year; a heavily weird, heavenly dark, hysterically magical Rock & Roll Sexperience.

ps. the only part of this story that isn’t true is the part about the shit hut. I actually was living at my parents house when i was discovered. Love, KT
Metz
Metz
There was a time, in recent history, when you needed to have at least twelve members to even be considered a band in Canada. It was nearly impossible to tour if you didn’t have access to some kind of personnel carrier, and making a record involved several years of tambourine overdubs. You know there were kids out there who just wanted to get in a van and play loud as hell through an Ampeg stack or a four-piece drum kit, but how could you call it a band if you didn’t even know a French horn player? By 2008, band membership had reached a critical mass. You’d go to a show and you might be the only person in the room who wasn’t playing an instrument. Hard times.

Thankfully, there are always a few naturally resourceful people who refuse to be intimidated or excluded from making their own wild racket in public. Alex Edkins, Hayden Menzies and Chris Slorach have been around long enough to know that if you can’t fit it in the van, it’s not worth bringing. METZ play like one brutally heavy instrument with three heads, slashing heavy-gauge strings, bending guitar and bass necks in weird unison, along with what is probably the loudest drumming you’ve ever heard. It’s a return to everything that’s good about loud, ecstatic live music; a frantic nod to Nation of Ulysses, Shellac, The Pixies, The Jesus Lizard, and Public Image Ltd. at their most vicious, while still carving out some heavy new business. They play the instruments, the amps, and the room.

Over the last three-and-a-half years, METZ have slayed in basements, skate shops, clubs, and festivals, sharing stages with Mission of Burma, Death from Above 1979, Archers of Loaf, Mudhoney, Oneida, Constantines, and NoMeansNo. I’ve seen a hundred jaws drop within the first four measures of their set. I once saw Alexander Hacke from Einstuerzende Neubauten approach Chris and rave about his bass tone.

It’s a formidable task to try and capture such a powerful live band on record. Luckily, Graham Walsh (Holy Fuck) and Alexandre Bonenfant were more than up for it. Isolating the band in an old barn for a week with a portable recording rig, Walsh and Bonenfant were not only successful in documenting the unrelenting live force of the band, but they also managed to add some new and staggering sonic textures to the recording. Waves of organic feedback and fuzzed-out drones build the classic tension that eventually drops into each track’s relentless, dissonant pulse. And somehow, the raddest thing about it all is the songwriting. It’s not just riffs. It’s something that some heavy bands don’t get, but METZ do really well—and they do it collectively. It’s a hell of an experience, listening to this thing.

With this, their debut album, METZ articulate with deafening clarity, what we’ve all known for some time: The world of good music needs a new power trio, and this is it.
Sean Bones
Sean Bones
Sean Bones' Buzzards Boy is one of an evolving artist setting out to test new waters only to find himself weathering a stylistic and emotional sea change. As with most second records, there's much to prove, but in the case of Buzzards Boy, Sean Bones transcends a varied stylistic past to reveal himself as an intriguing songwriter capable of truth and sonic spells.
On Buzzards Boy, Sean and his bandmates hooked up with a producer for the first time. Shane Stoneback was sought out for his uncanny recording methods (oil cans, toys amps) and his enthusiasm for the demos he was absorbing between his other name-brand projects (Fucked Up, Sleigh Bells, Cults) The sessions were brief and at some point during the week Bones resolved to taking on the rest of the project alone. Traveling between rehearsal spaces, bedrooms and eventually to the West Coast, he built an awesome second record from the foundation laid through this partnership.
The island he's trawling this time is darker and more lush. Tracks are swathed in reverby surf guitars and loose percussion. Its easy to imagine hearing this album out doors, at night. A full listen reveals a wide range of influences digested into something wholly Bones' own. "Tell Me Again" is a folky harmonium piece played over what sounds like the Miami Sound Machine. "Four Dub" explores open space and urgency. The sublime "Black Gold" starts with a scruffy hip hop beat until giving way to another one of those swoony boy-girl ballads that he's good at.
At the heart of Buzzards Boy is a romantic young man, worried about the world and checking himself for imagined damage. Somewhere in the storm came a renewed sense of purpose. Fittingly, the exuberant lead single "Here Now" was written last. Backed by Fool's Gold's Garrett Ray and Lewis Pesacov, the song brims with energy as an ecstatic Bones proclaims, "I'm here now, hold it down!." Whether he's here to remind himself or the rest of us doesn't matter - he track is his most confident and inspiring to date.
Bones will be releasing a limited number of physical, handmade vinyl copies of "Here Now" 7 inch records in February 2012, and a run of Buzzards Boy LPs the following May. Tours are slated for the Spring that'll see him play both with a band and on his own where he chops up his own music, lets us in on the process and basically hosts an off kilter dance party. There's also talk of another record in the can too. Considering his propensity for change and changing medias, it'll be interesting to watch this story play out.
Venue Information:
Music Hall of Williamsburg
66 North 6th St
Brooklyn, NY, 11211
http://www.musichallofwilliamsburg.com/