Music Hall of Williamsburg
Yeasayer: An Exclusive Live Stream

The Bowery Presents Live on YouTube

Yeasayer: An Exclusive Live Stream

Daedelus

Wed, August 15, 2012

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Music Hall of Williamsburg

Brooklyn, NY

$32 advance / $35 day of show

Sold Out

This event is 18 and over

Tickets still available for Yeasayer at Rumsey Playfield on September 12!


Yeasayer's set will be streamed live in HD via The Bowery Presents Live channel on YouTube. Subscribe now and tune in!

Yeasayer
Yeasayer
Yeasayer’s third album, ‘Fragrant World,’ is a hulking beast of a record. Keyboards clank and wheeze, tiny claps stumble against busted drum machines, and there’s very little obvious guitar. It’s an album that grapples with the schizophrenia of the modern world by gathering piles of electronics and molding them into something huge and often gorgeous.

After touring endlessly in support of 2010’s ‘Odd Blood,’ Chris Keating, Ira Wolf-Tuton and Anand Wilder holed up in Gary’s Electric Studios in Greenpoint, Brooklyn, to record ‘Fragrant World,’ working away as the borough transitioned from fall to winter. While ‘Odd Blood’ played with electronic textures and future paranoia, ‘Fragrant World’ fully immerses itself in those themes, virtually dripping with worry, love and concern for the planet we live on. Keating bleats and yammers his lyrics—sometimes, like on “Longevity,” piling so many effects on his voice that the music takes on an otherworldly sheen. In direct contrast are Wilder’s vocal contributions, which hover serenely over droning synths on “Blue Paper” and later weave in and out of staccato hand claps, and what sounds like a vintage computer dying, on “Devil and the Deed.”

Across the album’s 11 tracks, genre mashing is taken from a broad spectrum of sources: updated takes on dusky pop, jittery funk, exotic keyboard experimentation, haunting whirs of backward organ, exuberant bass, etc. “I wanted to make a record that was legitimately, to use a bad word, funky,” Chris Keating told ‘Under the Radar’ magazine. Even at its darkest, that statement holds true. On their first single and album centerpiece, “Henrietta,” Keating is in great form. The track is loosely based on Henrietta Lacks, a woman whose cells were cultured by a doctor in the 1950s without her permission. Those cells would later go on to be the most commonly used human cell line for medical research. Keating teases out universal ideas from bizarrely specific moments in history, repeating the refrain “We will live on forever,” referencing Lacks’ story directly, contrasted against a darkly optimistic worldview. It’s a risky move, but it pays off.

It’s a testament to their sound and the unique identity they’ve carved out for themselves in the music community. They’ve managed to grow and expand into what they are now without losing touch with what made them so compelling in the first place: their willingness to pull from every musical source imaginable. Whether it’s the warped and clipped alien-dance-floor banger “No Bones,” which has strong ties to Timbaland’s most experimental work for Aaliyah and Missy Elliott, or the Gothic, almost industrial pulse of “Reagan’s Skeleton,” Yeasayer are truly making 21st-century music. Couched in healthy fear, yet unafraid to move forward and expand, pulling in new influences just as frequently as new worries, Yeasayer have created a difficult, dense and beautiful record. It’s as much a synthesis of the last three decades of pop music as it is a new way of grappling with the end of time.

‘Fragrant World’ was produced by Yeasayer.
Daedelus
Daedelus
Alfred Darlington isn't your average cookie-cutter musician. From how he looks (early Victorian Dandism), to how he makes music, to how he expresses himself and views the world, his is a very individual, a 'bespoke' outlook.

Alfred was born in Santa Monica in 1977 to an artist mother and psychologist father. Musical from very early on, as a child he was classically and jazz-trained in a number of instruments, but his interests were broad and varied – less a prodigy than a renaissance boy whose obsessions ranged from Greek legend to the mountains of Wales. As a 15 year old he finally persuaded his parents to take him to the Principality. Whilst in a YMCA in London he flipped the radio dial, found a pirate radio station and taped some UK rave and hardcore. "It was my first 'Eureka!' moment in music," he says.

Back in the US he joined local rock bands, jazz bands and ska bands, which he enjoyed but felt limited by,too. At home he was listening to Warp, Ninja and your harder electronic stuff. He started DJing out the more leftfield side of drum and bass and making his own rudimentary productions. They were meant to be drum & bass but they kept turning out different and from his outsider's experiments his own style was born. He chose the name Daedelus as he had a childhood obsession with invention, and what was he doing, after all, if not tinkering and fiddling and experimenting like the "gentleman inventors" of old?

In 1999 he started DJing on Dublab.com for his "Entropy Sessions" and began dropping in his own early demo productions. Carlos Nino (of ammoncontact) had the show after him and usually pushed Alfred out the studio as quickly as possible as he was not so into Daedelus' confrontational DJ style, but when he heard a tranquil Daedelus production he took, in typical Nino style, Daedelus under his considerable wing around the LA scene. Nino placed
Daedelus tracks on two influential compilations and then persuaded Plug Research to release his debut album, "Invention" in 2002, Remixers included Madlib, who later took Daedelus' accordian parts and used them on the Madvillain record, closely followed by his "The Household" EP on Prefuse 73's Eastern Developments label.

In 2003, he was booked to play a show in San Diego by Brian Crabtree and Peter Siegerstrong and they asked him to test out an early prototype of the Monome box. "It's a Non-traditional electronic instrument," Daedelus explains. "Basically it allows for massive improvisation." Since then Daedelus has continued to use this revolutionary box, bringing much genuine liveness to the sometimes static world of performed electronic/dance music.

In 2003 he did "The Weather" album with Busdriver and Radioinactive and the remix album "Rethinking the Weather" on Mush records (home of cLOUDDEAD, also on Big Dada/Ninja Tune). 2004 saw the release of "Of Snowdonia" on Plug Research, the album with which Daedelus says he first "felt true artistic confidence, finding a true voice. I was finally in the right zone."

There was certainly no let up in his creativity. Also in 2004 he released the concept album "A Gent Agent" on tiny German label Laboratory Instinct. The 2005 album "Exquisite Corpse" on Mush album featured the likes of TTC, Mike Ladd, MF Doom. Ninja signed Daedelus for UK/Europe (a relationship which has reached its full expression on "Love To Make Music To," his first album for the label worldwide and put together with the help of their team). In 2006 "Denies the Days Demise" came out, a record showcasing his love of Brazilian music. Last year he released his first live album, "Live At the Low End Theory," and "The Fairweather Friends EP". Later this year will see the release of his collaboration with his wife, Laura Darling, as Long Lost!

And while his reputation has grown internationally, his place in the LA scene has also solidified. The musician that many of the hottest names in the city turn to for everything from bass clarinet licks to advice on obscure electronics, Daedelus has worked extensively with Taz from Sa-Ra, the pair of them opening for the likes of DJ Assault, Justice and Two Live Crew as well as appearing in Erykah Badu's most recent video.

As for "Love To Make Music To," Daedelus says that this album is "the imaginary memory of a time that never was! It's my drug/love record, harking back to that time in the YMCA in London, when I first heard rave…"
Venue Information:
Music Hall of Williamsburg
66 North 6th St
Brooklyn, NY, 11211
http://www.musichallofwilliamsburg.com/