Music Hall of Williamsburg
Lewis Del Mar

Lewis Del Mar

Blaenavon

Fri, April 21, 2017

Doors: 8:00 pm / Show: 9:00 pm

Music Hall of Williamsburg

Brooklyn, NY

$18 advance / $20 day of show

This event is 18 and over

Lewis Del Mar
Lewis Del Mar
Lewis Del Mar is a duo from Rockaway Beach in Queens, NY. The project is two lifelong friends, Danny Miller and Max Harwood, who have crafted a sound as challenging as it is comforting. Lewis Del Mar’s sonic hybrid blends barefaced bedroom recordings of acoustic guitars and soulful vocals over a rich soundscape of complex live and sampled percussion. A riveting tension exists as their sound calls upon inspiration ranging from latin folk to The Beastie Boys Paul’s Boutique and J Dilla.

In June of 2015 the duo made their presence known with the independent release of their first single “Loud(y).” The reaction was instantaneous and overwhelmingly positive; the New York Times claimed “Loud(y)” to be a “clattering profane mixed-media anthem.” Indie Shuffle, Pigeons & Planes, Consequence of Sound, KCRW and CMJ all hailed the song as one of the best of the year, while “Loud(y)” made the iTunes “Best Songs of 2015” list after only two weeks on the platform and landed top 5 on the Spotify Viral charts.

Humility and passion are brimming on the band’s debut EP. There is a uniquely human element to their sound and message – undeniably relatable while it continues to keep you guessing, peering curiously around the corner to get a glimpse of what’s next.
Blaenavon
Blaenavon
The story of Blaenavon’s debut album might be quite easily told: three teenage friends who entered a school talent contest, posted their songs online, and sprawled their way through early gigs, gathering a devoted fanbase and critical acclaim as they went. A band who, after the juggle of exams, EPs, record company attention, have finally delivered a debut album that is sumptuous and thrilling and brave.

But it is also a story of a more complicated time, a coming of age of sorts, of 12 intensely personal songs that explore friendship, sadness, hope, love held and lost, and all the confusions of youth in a world that is slowly revealing itself.

Ben Gregory, Frank Wright, and Harris McMillan were 14 and living in Hampshire when they first performed a slightly shambolic cover of Muse’s “Knights of Cydonia” in front of a judging panel of three geography teachers sitting on plastic chairs. The teachers were bemused, their fellow students rapturous, the boys themselves so lit up by the experience that they took up residence in a bedroom at Wright’s house, recording as they wrote, swiftly posting their songs to Soundcloud. It was a process that proved impulsive, instinctive, compelling — and they soon caught the attention of Transgressive, the record label that signed them early on.

In the years that followed, the teens released a handful of songs, focusing more of their attention on their A-levels — on studying jazz double bass and Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein, than the pursuit of rock stardom. Following their graduation, however, they made the decision to postpone college to record their debut album.

The band worked with producer Jim Abbiss (Arctic Monkeys, Adele, Bombay Bicycle Club) to create That’s Your Lot, whittling down their clutch of 100 songs, helping to find their sense and common thread.

Gregory is a remarkable lyrical talent, at times inspired by the writing of Herman Hesse and Evelyn Waugh and the songs of Elliott Smith, but with his own distinctive style: an openness, a keen wit, an eye for beauty. On bass and drums, Wright and McMillan provide Blaenavon’s musical backbone; a sound that is ambitious, majestic, ferocious, and refined.

To see Blaenavon live is to be struck by a sense of invincibility, and even at their earliest shows — even when they played their first London gig at the Barfly in 2012, they were infused with that same pluck and spirit. In this collection of songs, as in their stunning live shows, the sheer force of this band seems undeniable.

And in Gregory, it is impossible not to see the kindling of an artist coming to recognize his band is destined to be something special. “That’s Your Lot,” he says, mulling over the ambiguity of the album’s title. “Is this a parting message? A final goodbye? To a person or from us as artists? Is it more about the idea of fate and acceptance of what the world has planned for you?”
Venue Information:
Music Hall of Williamsburg
66 North 6th St
Brooklyn, NY, 11211
http://www.musichallofwilliamsburg.com/