Music Hall of Williamsburg
A Music Benefit for Planned Parenthood and The ACLU

A Music Benefit for Planned Parenthood and The ACLU

Sharon Van Etten, Beirut, Daniel Rossen, Kevin Morby, Hand Habits

Wed, January 18, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Music Hall of Williamsburg

Brooklyn, NY

$40

Sold Out

This event is 18 and over

A Music Benefit for Planned Parenthood and The ACLU
SHARON VAN ETTEN, BEIRUT, KEVIN MORBY, HELADO NEGRO, DANIEL ROSSEN AND MORE ANNOUNCE A MUSIC BENEFIT FOR PLANNED PARENTHOOD AND ACLU

JANUARY 18TH @ MUSIC HALL OF WILLIAMSBURG // JANUARY 19TH @ ROUGH TRADE

We're pleased to announce A Music Benefit for Planned Parenthood & The ACLU, two concerts happening in New York on January 18th and 19th to support two charities whose important work will only become more vital in the years to come. January 18th will see Sharon Van Etten, Beirut, Daniel Rossen, Kevin Morby, and Hand Habits at Music Hall of Williamsburg, while January 19th will feature Helado Negro, Beirut, Daniel Rossen, Kevin Morby, and Ruth Garbus. 100% of the proceeds from ticket sales will be split between the two charities. Tickets go on sale Wednesday at 12pm EST.

January 18th @ Music Hall of Williamsburg
Sharon Van Etten
Beirut
Daniel Rossen
Kevin Morby
Hand Habits
$40

January 19th @ Rough Trade
Helado Negro
Beirut
Daniel Rossen
Kevin Morby
Ruth Garbus
$30

About Planned Parenthood:
Planned Parenthood is the nation's leading provider and advocate of high-quality, affordable health care for women, men, and young people, as well as the nation's largest provider of sex education. With approximately 700 health centers across the country, Planned Parenthood organizations serve all patients with care and compassion, with respect and without judgment. Through health centers, programs in schools and communities, and online resources, Planned Parenthood is a trusted source of reliable health information that allows people to make informed health decisions.

About The ACLU:
For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties that the Constitution and the laws of the United States guarantee everyone in this country. Whether it’s achieving full equality for LGBT people, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age of widespread government surveillance, ending mass incarceration, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion, the ACLU takes up the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach. With more than 1 million members, activists, and supporters, the ACLU is a nationwide organization that fights tirelessly in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., to safeguard everyone’s rights.
Sharon Van Etten
Sharon Van Etten
For all the attention that was paid to her 2012 break-through Tramp, Sharon Van Etten is an artist with a manifest hunger to turn another corner. Writing from free-flowing emotional honesty and vulnerability creates a bond with the listener that few contemporary musicians can match. Compelled by a restless spirit, Van Etten is continuously challenging herself. Now, the result is Are We There, a self-produced album of exceptional intimacy, sublime generosity and immense breadth.

While most musicians are quite happy to leave the production end of things to someone else, with Are We There, Van Etten knew it was time to make a record entirely on her terms. The saying goes “fortune favors the bold” and yet this boldness had to be tempered. For this, Van Etten found a kindred spirit in veteran music producer Stewart Lerman whose expertise gave her the freedom to make Are We There the way she imagined. Originally working together on Boardwalk Empire, they gently moved into new roles, rallying around the idea of collaborating in Lerman’s studio in New Jersey.

It is clear from Are We There’s opening chords, we are witnessing a new awareness, a sign of Van Etten in full stride, writing, producing and performing from a place that seems almost mythical, were it not so touchable and real. Always direct, and never shying away from even the most personally painful narratives, Van Etten’s songwriting continues to evolve. Many of the songs deal with seemingly impossible decisions, anticipation, and then resolution. She sings of the nature of desire, memory, of being lost, emptiness, of promises and loyalty, fear and change, of healing and the true self, violence and sanctuary, waiting, of silence. The artist who speaks in such a voice is urging us to do something, to take hold and to go deeper.

Sharon Van Etten’s Are We There is out May 27th on Jagjaguwar.
Daniel Rossen
Daniel Rossen, as guitarist and co-lead vocalist, is one fourth of the band Grizzly Bear, as well as one half of Department of Eagles.

After writing some of the most critically-acclaimed songs of the last several years as part of Grizzly Bear and Department of Eagles, multi-instrumentalist and songwriter Rossen shared a brand new collection of wholly personal songs on his debut solo release Silent Hour / Golden Mile.

"Rossen's guitar playing has unmistakable personality," Pitchfork wrote in a review of the EP. "You could probably count on one hand the number of indie rock guitarists you can say this about right now, but a lot of listeners will recognize these as Daniel Rossen songs before he even opens his mouth."
Kevin Morby
Kevin Morby
Singing Saw is a record written simply and realized orchestrally. In it, Kevin Morby faces the reality that true beauty - deep and earned - demands a whole-world balance that includes our darker sides. It is a record of duality, one that marks another stage of growth for this young, gifted songwriter with a kind face and a complicated mind.

In the Autumn of 2014, Kevin Morby moved to the small Los Angeles neighborhood of Mount Washington. The move would shape Singing Saw, Morby's first album for new label Dead Oceans. Previous tenants at Morby's new home happened to leave an upright piano behind, with a few mysterious pieces of sheet music and an introductory book of common chords stacked on top. Thankful to finally be in one place for an extended spell, Morby, a beginner at the piano, immediately sat at the new instrument and began composing the songs that would form Singing Saw.

Alongside, he began taking long walks through the winding hills and side streets of the neighborhood each night, glimpsing views of both the skyline's sweeping lights and the dark, dried out underbrush of the LA flora. The duality of the city itself began to shape a set of lyrical ideas that he would refine with the sparse accompaniment of piano and acoustic guitar.

What is a singing saw It is an instrument that creates ethereal sounds, but it is also a tool: basic and practical while also being fearsome, even destructive. Morby watches the singing saw in its eponymous song; that instrument of eerie soft beauty cuts down the flowers in its path and chases after him, while his surroundings mock and dwarf him, Alice in Wonderland style. And in a singing saw, we can understand music as something more powerful than its inviting, delicate sound. No wonder Morby talks about a "songbook" in his head as something he needs to take up the hills so he can "get rid of it." Heavy themes are nothing new for Morby, whose previous records (2013's Harlem River and 2014's Still Life, both released on the Woodsist label) dealt with their own eerie visions and damning prophecies.

Morby opens Singing Saw with "Cut Me Down", a song of tears, debts and a prescient vision of being reduced to nothing. "I Have Been to the Mountain", "Destroyer" and "Black Flowers" continue to explore beauty and freedom, seizing upon the rot that seeps into even the supposedly safest of realms; peace, family and romantic love. By the end of the record on "Water", Morby is literally begging to be put out once and for all, like a fire that might burn all the visions away.

Travels beyond his mountain walks inform songs like "Dorothy", which recounts a trip to Portugal, witnessing a fishing ritual and luxuriating in the aura of a bar light-tinged reunion with old friends The touching innocence of "Ferris Wheel" stands alone in stark simplicity amidst the lush sonic textures of the album. Here, the album is balanced by Morby's signature sweetness and joie de vivre.

The arrangements of Singing Saw trace back to Morby's experience playing in The Complete Last Waltz, a live recreation of The Band's legendary last performance. There, Morby developed a fast friendship with producer/bandleader Sam Cohen (Apollo Sunshine, Yellow Birds), which led Morby to forgo recording in Los Angeles and take the nascent songs of Singing Saw to Isokon Studios in Woodstock, New York. There, in a converted A-frame house, they set about creating a record that would bring a sonic balance, intricacy and depth to match these songs and all that inspired them.

Sam Cohen added a multitude of instrumentation to the record (guitar, bass, drums and keyboard), and were joined by fellow Complete Last Waltz alum Marco Benevento on piano and keyboard, fleshing out Morby's original compositions and upholding the vision for a cohesive piano sound that serves as a touchstone for the entire album. Backup vocalists Hannah Cohen, Lauren Balthrop and Alecia Chakor contribute soaring harmonies; Nick Kinsey (Elvis Perkins) adds drums and percussion; Justin Sullivan, a longtime Morby collaborator and staple of his live band, contributes drums; Oliver Hill and Eliza Bag lift numerous songs with string accompaniments, and Alec Spiegelman on saxophone and flute and Cole Kamen-Green on trumpet bring dramatic swells. Finally, John Andrews (Quilt) adds the eerie lilt of the album's promise, providing saw on the "Cut Me Down" and "Singing Saw".

In the end, Morby fulfills the promise many heard on his first two albums, bringing his most realized effort of songwriting and lyricism to fruition. The songs of Singing Saw reflect the clarity that comes from welcoming change and embracing duality, and the distillation of those elements into an entirely new vision.
Hand Habits
Quietly engaging, focused but quick with a smile, Meg Duffy is always working. Out at a bar, in the van, Sunday morning coming down - she's writing, pulling the sounds out of the world around her. It's this patient awareness and commitment to craft that's made artists like Kevin Morby (The Babies, Woods), Robert Earl Thomas (Widowspeak), and Erin Birgy (Megabog) choose her as a collaborator. Hand Habits lets take her spheres of influence and transmute them into her own.

Duffy's songs, in turns ecstatic and reserved, draw power out of the mountains and rivers, but never shy away from the urban and suburban dissonances of modernity. Spending time inside of their delicately arranged space creates a deep resonance with the obscure valleys we all carry in our hearts, our private mental country homes. Through their lens we can feel the canyons in city streets and the lonely piers in subway platforms.

(bio by Andrew Siskind)
Venue Information:
Music Hall of Williamsburg
66 North 6th St
Brooklyn, NY, 11211
http://www.musichallofwilliamsburg.com/