Music Hall of Williamsburg
A Music Benefit for Planned Parenthood and The ACLU

A Music Benefit for Planned Parenthood and The ACLU

Sharon Van Etten, Beirut, Daniel Rossen, Kevin Morby, Hand Habits

Wed, January 18, 2017

Doors: 7:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

Music Hall of Williamsburg

Brooklyn, NY

$40

Sold Out

This event is 18 and over

A Music Benefit for Planned Parenthood and The ACLU
SHARON VAN ETTEN, BEIRUT, KEVIN MORBY, HELADO NEGRO, DANIEL ROSSEN AND MORE ANNOUNCE A MUSIC BENEFIT FOR PLANNED PARENTHOOD AND ACLU

JANUARY 18TH @ MUSIC HALL OF WILLIAMSBURG // JANUARY 19TH @ ROUGH TRADE

We're pleased to announce A Music Benefit for Planned Parenthood & The ACLU, two concerts happening in New York on January 18th and 19th to support two charities whose important work will only become more vital in the years to come. January 18th will see Sharon Van Etten, Beirut, Daniel Rossen, Kevin Morby, and Hand Habits at Music Hall of Williamsburg, while January 19th will feature Helado Negro, Beirut, Daniel Rossen, Kevin Morby, and Ruth Garbus. 100% of the proceeds from ticket sales will be split between the two charities. Tickets go on sale Wednesday at 12pm EST.

January 18th @ Music Hall of Williamsburg
Sharon Van Etten
Beirut
Daniel Rossen
Kevin Morby
Hand Habits
$40

January 19th @ Rough Trade
Helado Negro
Beirut
Daniel Rossen
Kevin Morby
Ruth Garbus
$30

About Planned Parenthood:
Planned Parenthood is the nation's leading provider and advocate of high-quality, affordable health care for women, men, and young people, as well as the nation's largest provider of sex education. With approximately 700 health centers across the country, Planned Parenthood organizations serve all patients with care and compassion, with respect and without judgment. Through health centers, programs in schools and communities, and online resources, Planned Parenthood is a trusted source of reliable health information that allows people to make informed health decisions.

About The ACLU:
For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has been our nation’s guardian of liberty, working in courts, legislatures, and communities to defend and preserve the individual rights and liberties that the Constitution and the laws of the United States guarantee everyone in this country. Whether it’s achieving full equality for LGBT people, establishing new privacy protections for our digital age of widespread government surveillance, ending mass incarceration, or preserving the right to vote or the right to have an abortion, the ACLU takes up the toughest civil liberties cases and issues to defend all people from government abuse and overreach. With more than 1 million members, activists, and supporters, the ACLU is a nationwide organization that fights tirelessly in all 50 states, Puerto Rico, and Washington, D.C., to safeguard everyone’s rights.
Sharon Van Etten
Sharon Van Etten
For all the attention that was paid to her 2012 break-through Tramp, Sharon Van Etten is an artist with a manifest hunger to turn another corner. Writing from free-flowing emotional honesty and vulnerability creates a bond with the listener that few contemporary musicians can match. Compelled by a restless spirit, Van Etten is continuously challenging herself. Now, the result is Are We There, a self-produced album of exceptional intimacy, sublime generosity and immense breadth.

While most musicians are quite happy to leave the production end of things to someone else, with Are We There, Van Etten knew it was time to make a record entirely on her terms. The saying goes “fortune favors the bold” and yet this boldness had to be tempered. For this, Van Etten found a kindred spirit in veteran music producer Stewart Lerman whose expertise gave her the freedom to make Are We There the way she imagined. Originally working together on Boardwalk Empire, they gently moved into new roles, rallying around the idea of collaborating in Lerman’s studio in New Jersey.

It is clear from Are We There’s opening chords, we are witnessing a new awareness, a sign of Van Etten in full stride, writing, producing and performing from a place that seems almost mythical, were it not so touchable and real. Always direct, and never shying away from even the most personally painful narratives, Van Etten’s songwriting continues to evolve. Many of the songs deal with seemingly impossible decisions, anticipation, and then resolution. She sings of the nature of desire, memory, of being lost, emptiness, of promises and loyalty, fear and change, of healing and the true self, violence and sanctuary, waiting, of silence. The artist who speaks in such a voice is urging us to do something, to take hold and to go deeper.

Sharon Van Etten’s Are We There is out May 27th on Jagjaguwar.
Daniel Rossen
Daniel Rossen, as guitarist and co-lead vocalist, is one fourth of the band Grizzly Bear, as well as one half of Department of Eagles.

After writing some of the most critically-acclaimed songs of the last several years as part of Grizzly Bear and Department of Eagles, multi-instrumentalist and songwriter Rossen shared a brand new collection of wholly personal songs on his debut solo release Silent Hour / Golden Mile.

"Rossen's guitar playing has unmistakable personality," Pitchfork wrote in a review of the EP. "You could probably count on one hand the number of indie rock guitarists you can say this about right now, but a lot of listeners will recognize these as Daniel Rossen songs before he even opens his mouth."
Kevin Morby
Kevin Morby
City Music is an airplane descending over frozen lakes into Chicago. City Music is riding the Q Train out to Coney Island to smell the ocean and a morning in Philadelphia where greats cranes reconfigure the buildings like an endless puzzle. City Music is a quiet afternoon moment on a bench in Baltimore, a highway in Seattle at night where the distant houses look like tiny flames and a bottle of red wine being drained on a bridge in Paris. City Music is a bus pulling into St. Louis at dawn where the arch looks like a metal rainbow reflecting the days early sunlight.

City Music is also the new album by Kevin Morby. Full of listless wanderlust, it's a collection inspired by and devoted to the metropolitan experience across America and beyond by a songwriter cast from his own mould. As he puts it: "It is a mix-tape, a fever dream, a love letter dedicated to those cities that I cannot get rid of, to those cities that are all inside of me."

His fourth album, City Music works as a counterpart to Morby's acclaimed 2016 release Singing Saw, an autobiographical set that reflected the solitude and landscape in which it was recorded. It was imagined as "an old bookshelf with a young Bob and Joni staring back at me, blank and timeless. They live here, in this left side of my brain, smoking cigarettes and playing acoustic guitars while lying on an unmade bed."

And now follows City Music, the yang to its yin, the heads to its tails. It is an collection crafted using the other side of its creator's brain, the jumping off point perhaps best once again encapsulated by an image. "Here, Lou Reed and Patti Smith stare out at the listener," explains Morby. "Stretched out on a living room floor they are somewhere in mid-70s Manhattan, also smoking cigarettes." It finds Morby exploring similar themes of solitude, but this time framed by a window of an uptown apartment that looks down upon an international urban landscape "exposed like a giant bleeding wound."

Morby rose to prominence as bassist in Woods, with who he recorded seven albums on Woodsist Records (Kurt Vile, The Oh Sees, Real Estate) while also forming The Babies with Cassie Ramone of Vivian Girls. Two albums and a clutch of classic singles with the latter followed. Morby's 2013 debut solo work Harlem River was a homage to New York and featured contributions from artists including Cate Le Bon and Tim Presley (of White Fence), while 2014's Still Life garnered universal critical praise. "It's easy to picture Morby with a wineskin under his arm," noted a Pitchfork review. "His every worldly possession hitched to his back, an eye constantly fixed on some faraway point on the horizon."

Recording at Panoramic Studios, a central Californian home-turned-recording studio, City Music saw Morby joined once again by former The Babies cohorts Megan Duffy (guitar) and Justin Sullivan (drums). Here the vocals were at recorded night, in darkness, overlooking a Pacific Ocean illuminated only by the stars, the wash and whisper of the ebbing tidal a distant soundtrack. Six weeks of European touring had left the trio speaking a secret language that only a band can speak. "The language of a musical family," explains Morby. "There was an outdoor shower with no curtain and deer ran through the front yard during the meals we cooked for each other..." The record was completed with Richard Swift in Oregon (producer of Foxygen, sometime member of The Black Keys).

From the widescreen opening of 'Come To Me Now' through the bubblegum stomp of the Ramones-eulogising '1-2-3-4' (which also references late poet Jim Carroll's litany of friends lost, 'People Who Died'), a stripped-back and wistful cover of 'Caught In My Eye' by nihilistic LA punk wrecking crew Germs and on to Leonard Cohen-evoking closer 'Downtown's Lights', City Music reads like a selection of musical postcards composed and posted in the moment. It is a forensic and poetic examination of a modern America in love with the myth of itself.

At the big beating heart of these songs is the voice and conscience of the city. All cities. We see them viewed from differing angles; from down in the gutter, and drifting up into the celestial firmament. "I am walking through a Chinatown in a major American city and now I am a guitar part taking place in my head," offers Morby by a way of a commentary for the album's inception. "It falls around me like rain, dancing with the neon lights coming off of the signs of the restaurants and bars. Now I am a lamp full of hot air floating away, looking down. The city is beautiful like one million candles with different sized flames, moving in their own directions. A line finds me and grabbing it I hold on tight. I sing to myself, 'Oh, that City Music, oh that city sound...'"

Here the album gives voice to the all those cities speaking the same universal language of chaos and commerce and culture. It views the city as an Oz-like experience, with your host cast as Dorothy, the Scarecrow, the Tin Man and the Cowardly Lion, a narrator by turns innocent, awestruck, fearful and fearless. Where a world once black and white is now rainbow coloured. "I am a city and I have many moods," it says via its human conduit. "I am dangerous and I am gorgeous. Like a proud forest made of metal and brick I am constantly changing shape, growing bigger and smaller all at the same time. I hold you but you do not hold me...."

City Music. Let it hold you.

Ben Myers.

March 2017.
Hand Habits
Quietly engaging, focused but quick with a smile, Meg Duffy is always working. Out at a bar, in the van, Sunday morning coming down - she's writing, pulling the sounds out of the world around her. It's this patient awareness and commitment to craft that's made artists like Kevin Morby (The Babies, Woods), Robert Earl Thomas (Widowspeak), and Erin Birgy (Megabog) choose her as a collaborator. Hand Habits lets take her spheres of influence and transmute them into her own.

Duffy's songs, in turns ecstatic and reserved, draw power out of the mountains and rivers, but never shy away from the urban and suburban dissonances of modernity. Spending time inside of their delicately arranged space creates a deep resonance with the obscure valleys we all carry in our hearts, our private mental country homes. Through their lens we can feel the canyons in city streets and the lonely piers in subway platforms.

(bio by Andrew Siskind)
Venue Information:
Music Hall of Williamsburg
66 North 6th St
Brooklyn, NY, 11211
http://www.musichallofwilliamsburg.com/